Hugh Turvey: Inside the Life of an X-Ray Artist

Hugh Turvey is a British artist and photographer who uses x-ray technology to create what he calls Xograms, a fusion of visible light and x-ray imagery.

  1. X-ray image of an elephant skull and tusks.
  2. Turvey experimented by photographing his wife’s foot in a high-heeled shoe.
  3. An x-ray image of a Dachshund wearing a protective cone.
  4. X-ray of a goldfish in a bowl.

More over at National Geographic



mothernaturenetwork:

Going ape for apps: Young orangutan plays with iPadZookeepers at the Milwaukee County Zoo have been using iPads as enrichment tools for nearly a year now.

mothernaturenetwork:

Going ape for apps: Young orangutan plays with iPad
Zookeepers at the Milwaukee County Zoo have been using iPads as enrichment tools for nearly a year now.


realcleverscience:

Speaking with all the expertise of a man with a psych undergrad degree, I’m actually surprised it’s taken us this long. (And tumblr should have its own sub-category!)

Actually, the debate over including it is rather interesting and has much to do with how we define illness in the first place. (Consider this: homosexuality used to be listed as an ‘illness’.) It also has a bit to do with how we think about addictions and compulsions in general.

All in all, a pretty interesting case study.

For a bit more of a substantial discussion than the nydailynews provides, see herehere, and wiki.


emergentfutures:

Pentagon Regrowing Soldiers’ Muscles From Pig Cells
A few pig cells, a single surgery and a rigorous daily workout: They’re the three ingredients that patients will need to re-grow fresh, functional slabs of their own muscle, courtesy of Pentagon-backed science that’s already being used to rebuild parts of people.
Full Story: Wired

emergentfutures:

Pentagon Regrowing Soldiers’ Muscles From Pig Cells

A few pig cells, a single surgery and a rigorous daily workout: They’re the three ingredients that patients will need to re-grow fresh, functional slabs of their own muscle, courtesy of Pentagon-backed science that’s already being used to rebuild parts of people.

Full Story: Wired



realcleverscience:

springwise:

 
USB-equipped urban bikes can charge mobile devices
With so many gadgets and mobile devices in common use today, keeping them all charged has become an ongoing challenge. We’ve already seen numerous efforts to help consumers do just that in taxis and atfestivals, for example, but recently we came across a new approach targeting urban cyclists. Specifically, German bicycle maker Silverback has recently launched two bikes with built-in USB ports that can charge devices as the rider pedals. READ MORE…

Pretty awesome, but I’d like to see a device like this that you can add to the bike you already own.

realcleverscience:

springwise:

USB-equipped urban bikes can charge mobile devices

With so many gadgets and mobile devices in common use today, keeping them all charged has become an ongoing challenge. We’ve already seen numerous efforts to help consumers do just that in taxis and atfestivals, for example, but recently we came across a new approach targeting urban cyclists. Specifically, German bicycle maker Silverback has recently launched two bikes with built-in USB ports that can charge devices as the rider pedals. READ MORE…

Pretty awesome, but I’d like to see a device like this that you can add to the bike you already own.


realcleverscience:

emergentfutures:

A NEW smartphone app developed by scientists in Tel Aviv could delay the need for reading glasses in older people by training the mind to process blurred images, researchers said.

Full Story: The Australian

Another awesome example of smart-phones in action. Dig!


approachingsignificance:

Scientists Develop Miniaturized Fluorescence Microscope (via GEN)

Scientists have developed a miniaturized integrated fluorescence microscope weighing just 1.9 g, which can be carried around on the head of a freely moving adult mouse. Based on readily mass-produced micro-optics and semiconductor optoelectronics, the instrument incorporates all its optical parts in a 2.4 cm3 housing. The Stanford University designers claim that in comparison with high-resolution fiberoptic technologies, their microscope demonstrates numerous advantages in terms of optical sensitivity, field of view, attainable resolution, cost, and portability, as it doesn’t require optical realignment when transported.

I’m really excited to see what kind of neuron images this tiny microscope will produce.  

Remember when I posted this a while back?  Well here is some footage from the camera.  This is amazing stuff here, take some time to watch the movie.  

approachingsignificance:

Scientists Develop Miniaturized Fluorescence Microscope (via GEN)

Scientists have developed a miniaturized integrated fluorescence microscope weighing just 1.9 g, which can be carried around on the head of a freely moving adult mouse. Based on readily mass-produced micro-optics and semiconductor optoelectronics, the instrument incorporates all its optical parts in a 2.4 cm3 housing. The Stanford University designers claim that in comparison with high-resolution fiberoptic technologies, their microscope demonstrates numerous advantages in terms of optical sensitivity, field of view, attainable resolution, cost, and portability, as it doesn’t require optical realignment when transported.

I’m really excited to see what kind of neuron images this tiny microscope will produce.  

Remember when I posted this a while back?  Well here is some footage from the camera.  This is amazing stuff here, take some time to watch the movie.  


realcleverscience:

One day soon we will truly become a wireless technological civilization. This doesn’t just mean not having to charge your laptop all the time, or even ridding ourselves of the infamous ‘black spaghetti’. I’m talking about being connected to the emerging “hive mind” and “smart-everything”. We will all be one step closer to fully hybridizing ourselves with eachother, our environment, and the collected knowledge of mankind through our own technological inventions.
So, yeah, in other words we’re just talking about a revolutionary step in the history of our planet that we’re rapidly approaching. 
(*ugh* This much awesomeness gives me butterflies that hurt! Toooo awesome! oh!)
RCS Highlights:
…Even though improvements have brought [wireless sensors’] energy consumption down, wireless sensors’ batteries still need changing periodically. Especially for networks in remote locales, replacing batteries in thousands of sensors is a staggering task.
To get around the power constraint, researchers are harnessing electricity from low-power sources in the environment, such as vibrations from swaying bridges, humming machinery and rumbling foot traffic. Such natural energy sources could do away with the need for batteries, powering wireless sensors indefinitely.
Now researchers at MIT have designed a device the size of a U.S. quarter that harvests energy from low-frequency vibrations, such as those that might be felt along a pipeline or bridge. The tiny energy harvester — known technically as a microelectromechanical system, or MEMS — picks up a wider range of vibrations than current designs, and is able to generate 100 times the power of devices of similar size…
To harvest electricity from environmental vibrations, researchers have typically looked to piezoelectric materials such as quartz and other crystals. Such materials naturally accumulate electric charge in response to mechanical stress (piezo, in Greek, means to squeeze or press). In the past few years, researchers have exploited piezoelectric material, or PZT, at the microscale, engineering MEMS devices that generate small amounts of power…
The researchers calculated that [their new] device was able to generate 45 microwatts of power with just a single layer of PZT — an improvement of two orders of magnitude compared to current designs…
“Our target is at least 100 microwatts, and that’s what all the electronics guys are asking us to get to… For monitoring a pipeline, if you generate 100 microwatts, you can power a network of smart sensors that can talk forever with each other, using this system.”

"So, yeah, in other words we’re just talking about a revolutionary step in the history of our planet that we’re rapidly approaching."
And it really is approaching rather quickly.  

realcleverscience:

One day soon we will truly become a wireless technological civilization. This doesn’t just mean not having to charge your laptop all the time, or even ridding ourselves of the infamous ‘black spaghetti’. I’m talking about being connected to the emerging “hive mind” and “smart-everything”. We will all be one step closer to fully hybridizing ourselves with eachother, our environment, and the collected knowledge of mankind through our own technological inventions.

So, yeah, in other words we’re just talking about a revolutionary step in the history of our planet that we’re rapidly approaching. 

(*ugh* This much awesomeness gives me butterflies that hurt! Toooo awesome! oh!)

RCS Highlights:

…Even though improvements have brought [wireless sensors’] energy consumption down, wireless sensors’ batteries still need changing periodically. Especially for networks in remote locales, replacing batteries in thousands of sensors is a staggering task.

To get around the power constraint, researchers are harnessing electricity from low-power sources in the environment, such as vibrations from swaying bridges, humming machinery and rumbling foot traffic. Such natural energy sources could do away with the need for batteries, powering wireless sensors indefinitely.

Now researchers at MIT have designed a device the size of a U.S. quarter that harvests energy from low-frequency vibrations, such as those that might be felt along a pipeline or bridge. The tiny energy harvester — known technically as a microelectromechanical system, or MEMS — picks up a wider range of vibrations than current designs, and is able to generate 100 times the power of devices of similar size

To harvest electricity from environmental vibrations, researchers have typically looked to piezoelectric materials such as quartz and other crystals. Such materials naturally accumulate electric charge in response to mechanical stress (piezo, in Greek, means to squeeze or press). In the past few years, researchers have exploited piezoelectric material, or PZT, at the microscale, engineering MEMS devices that generate small amounts of power…

The researchers calculated that [their new] device was able to generate 45 microwatts of power with just a single layer of PZT — an improvement of two orders of magnitude compared to current designs…

“Our target is at least 100 microwatts, and that’s what all the electronics guys are asking us to get to… For monitoring a pipeline, if you generate 100 microwatts, you can power a network of smart sensors that can talk forever with each other, using this system.”

"So, yeah, in other words we’re just talking about a revolutionary step in the history of our planet that we’re rapidly approaching."

And it really is approaching rather quickly.  


Scientists Develop Miniaturized Fluorescence Microscope (via GEN)

Scientists have developed a miniaturized integrated fluorescence microscope weighing just 1.9 g, which can be carried around on the head of a freely moving adult mouse. Based on readily mass-produced micro-optics and semiconductor optoelectronics, the instrument incorporates all its optical parts in a 2.4 cm3 housing. The Stanford University designers claim that in comparison with high-resolution fiberoptic technologies, their microscope demonstrates numerous advantages in terms of optical sensitivity, field of view, attainable resolution, cost, and portability, as it doesn’t require optical realignment when transported.

I’m really excited to see what kind of neuron images this tiny microscope will produce.  

Scientists Develop Miniaturized Fluorescence Microscope (via GEN)

Scientists have developed a miniaturized integrated fluorescence microscope weighing just 1.9 g, which can be carried around on the head of a freely moving adult mouse. Based on readily mass-produced micro-optics and semiconductor optoelectronics, the instrument incorporates all its optical parts in a 2.4 cm3 housing. The Stanford University designers claim that in comparison with high-resolution fiberoptic technologies, their microscope demonstrates numerous advantages in terms of optical sensitivity, field of view, attainable resolution, cost, and portability, as it doesn’t require optical realignment when transported.

I’m really excited to see what kind of neuron images this tiny microscope will produce.  


realcleverscience:

sciencecenter:

The very first insulin pump was a bit… cumbersome.

Like the early computers and other examples, our technologies are growing stronger, faster, better… and smaller by the day.
So much love for science!

realcleverscience:

sciencecenter:

The very first insulin pump was a bit… cumbersome.

Like the early computers and other examples, our technologies are growing stronger, faster, better… and smaller by the day.

So much love for science!