Reblog / posted 1 week ago with 25 notes

The intended victim, a 43-year-old man who has not been named, says his wife tried to lure him into bed and encouraged him to perform oral sex on her. His suspicions were aroused when he noticed an unusual odour emanating from her private parts and, fearing she was unwell, took her to hospital, Brazil’s Tvi24 reports. Medical tests revealed she had doused her vagina with enough of the unspecified toxin to kill both her husband and herself.

Confronted with the test results the woman reportedly confessed to her crime. It is believed she hatched the bizarre plot after asking her husband for a divorce, a request he now seems rather more likely to acquiesce to. Tvi24 says the woman has received medical treatment and sources claim her husband plans to sue her for attempted murder.

I can’t. 

Why was she not charged with attempted murder?


"Overall, then, inmates with mental disorders are disproportionately represented among victims of physical violence inside prison. However, their rate of physical victimization in prison compares favorably with their estimated rate of victimization in the community. In their study, Teplin et al. (2005) estimated that more than one-quarter of persons with SMI had been victims of a violent crime in the past year, a rate more than 11 times higher than the general population rates even after controlling for demographic differences. This suggests that the risk of physical victimization for individuals with mental disorder in the community is significantly greater than their risk of being physically victimized in prison."

Blitz, C.L., Wolff, N., & Shi, J. 2008. “Physical Vicitmization in Prison: The Role of Mental Illness.” International Journal of Law and Psychiatry.

This suggests that the risk of physical victimization for individuals with mental disorder in the community is significantly greater than their risk of being physically victimized in prison.


Fear of victimization does not equal the reality of victimization. 

Many groups that fear victimization the most actually have significantly lower rates of victimization compared to their counterparts. 

Those that fear victimization the least actually get victimized the most. 


"…having one’s throat cut can change the way one looks at the world, or at least at one’s self."
— Adrian Raine, The Anatomy of Violence

Rates of violent victimization in the United States broken down by Gender, Race/Ethnicity, and Age.
2012 National Crime Victimization Survey- Department of Justice, Bureau of Justice Statistics 
This includes crimes not reported to the police. Standard errors can be found in the linked pdf in the appendix, for all the fellow nerds out there.
Just to put everything into a little perspective. 

Rates of violent victimization in the United States broken down by Gender, Race/Ethnicity, and Age.

2012 National Crime Victimization Survey- Department of Justice, Bureau of Justice Statistics 

This includes crimes not reported to the police. Standard errors can be found in the linked pdf in the appendix, for all the fellow nerds out there.

Just to put everything into a little perspective. 


"The line between good and evil cuts through the heart of every human being."
— Alexandre Solzenitsyn

"If men define situations as real, they are real in their consequences."
— W.I. Thomas, The Child in America (1928)

"You never realize how much of your background is sewn into the lining of your clothes."
Tom Wolfe

Academia

I have two classes that I’m teaching this summer. Both are just introductory courses: Introduction to Criminology. The first starts in a little over a week.

I’m excited/terrified. I always get a little anxious before talking in front of people, but once I get going I usually do great talking to large groups of people. 

Here’s an idea I had:

  1. Have my girlfriend attend the first few classes as an undercover student.
  2. Have her play with her phone, be a little disruptive, and generally be rude when I ask her a question.
  3. On day 2 or 3, have her texting and laughing aloud while I am lecturing. 
  4. Walk over to her and take her (fake) phone and smash it against the wall and kick her out of my class in a blaze of glory.
  5. The students never see her again, but fear and respect me.

I won’t do any of that, but I can dream. 


"In all societies, the stigma of criminal convictions and sentences of imprisonment creates difficulties for ex-offenders when they try to secure employment, find housing, form relationships, or resettle in the outside world. But in the United States, these de facto social consequences of conviction are exacerbated by a set of de jure legal consequences that extend and intensify the sanction in multiple ways. Disenfranchisement, either temporary or permanent; disqualification from public office and jury service; ineligibility for federal housing benefits, education benefits, and welfare assistance; liability to court costs and prison fees; exclusion from various licensed occupations; banishment from specified urban areas; and where the offender is a noncitizen, deportation-all of these concomitants of a criminal conviction for millions of individuals."
— "Penality and the Penal State." Criminology (2013) - David Garland

Academia

So much work to do. It never ends. Only a few more weeks, but so many projects to write up. 

Currently: in the lab by myself working. Forever.

It is almost over, but I’m so stressed and overworked right now. 


Portrait of an artist, who transforms neurons into ‘butterflies’

After completing a fellowship at the National Institutes of Health, artist Rebecca Kamen has transformed her discussions with neuroscientists into abstract sculptures.

See more of her work: Rebecca Kamen


Choosing Redemption Over Revenge in Iran

Instead of participating in the execution of their son’s murderer, the slain man’s parents publicly spare the killer in northern Iran.

  1. Balal, who reportedly stabbed-to-death 18-year-old Abdolah Hosseinzadeh in a street fight in 2007, is led to the gallows to be executed on Tuesday.
  2. Abdolah Hosseinzadeh’s mothers slaps Balal, who was convicted of her son’s murder in the northern city of Nowshahr on Tuesday. In Iran, a victim’s family is able to participate in hangings by pushing aside the chair the convicted stands on. In this case, Hosseinzadeh’s parents removed the noose from Balal’s neck and spared his life, The Guardian reported.
  3. Abdolah Hosseinzadeh’s parents remove the noose from the neck of convicted murderer Balal, according to semi-official news service Isna and The Guardian newspaper.
  4. Samereh Alinejad cries after sparing the life of her son’s convicted murderer.
  5. The mother of Balal (L), who was convicted of murdering Abdolah Hosseinzadeh in a street fight in 2007, cries with Hosseinzadeh’s mother.

Touching. See Crime, Shame, and Reintegration by Braithwaite.

I abhor the death penalty, but love the role of the victim’s family in the punishment process. 


"The human animal is an attentive animal, and his attention may be given to stimuli that are relatively faint. One can pick out sounds at a distance… Not only do we open the door to certain stimuli and close it to others, but out attention is an organizing process… Our attention enables us to organize the field in which we are going to act. Here we have the organism as acting and determining its environment. It is not simply a set of passive senses played upon by the stimuli that come from without. The organism goes out and determines what it is going to respond to and organizes that world."
— George Herbert Mead, 1964

Victim Blaming

I’m writing a paper of the attribution of blame in crimes and would like to know some of your opinions. 

Why do we blame victims of sexual assault?

No need to include any thoughts or comments about how victim blaming affects victims, that isn’t the focus of the paper and that topic could fill up an entire paper itself. Try to be as specific as you can (for example, sexism or patriarchy replies do not produce causal mechanisms in blame attribution).

Feel free to reply here, or if you wish to remain anonymous you can send me a private message. There are no right or wrong answers, I am genuinely curious about your opinions. I won’t post any answers, so have at it. 

Personally, why do you think we blame victims of sexual assault? What are the causal mechanisms that drive the attribution of blame?