HOW DO PHYSICIANS WANT TO DIE?

 When you ask people how they’d like to die, most will say that they want to die quickly, painlessly, and peacefully… preferably in their sleep.
But, if you ask them whether they would want various types of interventions, were they on the cusp of death and already living a low-quality of life, they typically say “yes,” “yes,” and “can I have some more please.”  Blood transfusions, feeding tubes, invasive testing, chemotherapy, dialysis, ventilation, and chest pumping CPR. Most people say “yes.”
But not physicians.  Doctors, it turns out, overwhelmingly say “no.”

Interesting to see that those individuals that perform these procedures on people to help save, extend, or make lives more comfortable would choose not to have those same procedures performed on themselves. The author emphasizes that physicians, because of performing these procedures, are more aware of how horrible they can be while at the same time understanding that the procedures are not as effective as most non-physicians believe. Physicians never reached a 20% for ‘Yes’ to any procedure, except pain medication. 
By Lisa Wade over at Sociological Images

HOW DO PHYSICIANS WANT TO DIE?

 When you ask people how they’d like to die, most will say that they want to die quickly, painlessly, and peacefully… preferably in their sleep.

But, if you ask them whether they would want various types of interventions, were they on the cusp of death and already living a low-quality of life, they typically say “yes,” “yes,” and “can I have some more please.”  Blood transfusions, feeding tubes, invasive testing, chemotherapy, dialysis, ventilation, and chest pumping CPR. Most people say “yes.”

But not physicians.  Doctors, it turns out, overwhelmingly say “no.”

Interesting to see that those individuals that perform these procedures on people to help save, extend, or make lives more comfortable would choose not to have those same procedures performed on themselves. The author emphasizes that physicians, because of performing these procedures, are more aware of how horrible they can be while at the same time understanding that the procedures are not as effective as most non-physicians believe. Physicians never reached a 20% for ‘Yes’ to any procedure, except pain medication. 

By Lisa Wade over at Sociological Images


Tattooed human skin specimens.

UCL Pathology Collections. 

Photo Credit: Gemma Angel. via


Reblog / posted 1 year ago with 96 notes
Man unknowingly has a knife stuck in his face for four years.

A man who went to the doctor complaining of a headache was shocked to discover he’d had a 4in knife blade stuck in his brain for more than four years.
Li Fu from Yunnan Province, China, was stabbed during a robbery in 2006, and the blade of the knife had lodged in his cranium.
But despite receiving treatment for his injuries, doctors failed to notice the knife buried deep in the 37-year-old’s skull.

Wait, what? 

Man unknowingly has a knife stuck in his face for four years.

A man who went to the doctor complaining of a headache was shocked to discover he’d had a 4in knife blade stuck in his brain for more than four years.

Li Fu from Yunnan Province, China, was stabbed during a robbery in 2006, and the blade of the knife had lodged in his cranium.

But despite receiving treatment for his injuries, doctors failed to notice the knife buried deep in the 37-year-old’s skull.

Wait, what? 


"No medicine cures what happiness cannot."
— Gabriel Garcia Marquez

Reblog / posted 1 year ago with 31 notes

First Ever Video Of A Thought Taking Shape Captured

Researchers at Japan’s National Institute of Genetics believe they’ve captured a world first video — images of a thought making it’s way through the brain of a zebrafish.

Researchers were able to image visual perception in the fish using a new tool designed just for the purpose — a super-sensitive fluorescent probe that detects neuron activity, causing neurons to light up when they’re activated. In this case, the images are of the activity in neurons as a zebrafish watches a paramecium flit around it, registering the movement of its prey.

Thought might be a bit of a stretch, and this should definitely be taked with a grain of salt, but this still can be a little exciting. 


Building New Body Parts

Alex Seifalian’s lab at University College London is helping humans who lose body parts to repair their bodies the way a newt would if it lost its tail – by growing another.

The researchers in his lab, which Seifalian calls “the human body parts store,” create the body parts with synthetic materials and a patient’s stem cells.

The lab builds a scaffold of the needed body part with a porous nanocomposite material, developed and patented by the team, and then puts it in a bioreactor with some of the patient’s bone marrow. The patient’s cells cover the scaffold and fill its many holes so that it essentially becomes the patient’s own.

After it is inserted into the patient, it’s absorbed by the body and replaced by new cells over time.

1. A nose mold made of nanocomposite material seeded with cells in a cell solution.

2. A nose mold. 

3. An ear mold made of nanocomposite material.

4. A lab-grown trachea, or windpipe, inside a bioreactor. 

5. An artery is tested using a simulated heard and blood flow. 

6. Nose and ear molds made of nanocomposite material seeded with cells in a cell solution. 

Credit: Seamus Murphy/VII


medicalschool:

‘Tattoos no longer confined to sailors’: Ottawa Hospital told it can’t force nurses to hide body art or remove piercingsThe Ottawa Hospital’s pioneering attempt to impose a dress code on its staff has been struck down by a labour arbitrator, who ruled there was no justification for ordering workers to cover up their tattoos and remove their piercings.Defending a policy considered unique in Canadian health care, the hospital had argued the body art could be disturbing to patients who need all the help they can get to recover.Arbitrator Lorne Slotnick agreed some of the hospitals’ older patients might have a more negative first impression of a nurse sporting a tattoo or nose ring, but concluded there was no evidence the adornments affected patient health. The dress code did, on the other hand, unjustifiably restrict staff members’ right “to present themselves as they see fit,” he said.“As sideburns were controversial in 1972, so tattoos and piercings are now,” the arbitrator said. (Thinkstock/Dina Rudick/Globe staff)

medicalschool:

Tattoos no longer confined to sailors’: Ottawa Hospital told it can’t force nurses to hide body art or remove piercings
The Ottawa Hospital’s pioneering attempt to impose a dress code on its staff has been struck down by a labour arbitrator, who ruled there was no justification for ordering workers to cover up their tattoos and remove their piercings.

Defending a policy considered unique in Canadian health care, the hospital had argued the body art could be disturbing to patients who need all the help they can get to recover.

Arbitrator Lorne Slotnick agreed some of the hospitals’ older patients might have a more negative first impression of a nurse sporting a tattoo or nose ring, but concluded there was no evidence the adornments affected patient health. The dress code did, on the other hand, unjustifiably restrict staff members’ right “to present themselves as they see fit,” he said.

“As sideburns were controversial in 1972, so tattoos and piercings are now,” the arbitrator said. (Thinkstock/Dina Rudick/Globe staff)


Reblog / posted 1 year ago with 19 notes
Is It Time to Treat Violence Like a Contagious Disease?
Interesting read, but the short answer is absolutely not. A disease model of violent crime is detrimental to the study of crime. Nice metaphor, but this is nowhere near academic worthiness. Mere exposure to violence does not account for enough variance in violent behaviors. Applying a disease model to violent crime or violence oversimplifies the phenomena and discredits the vast archive of criminological research on violence that has been established.


'People often don't have an answer why violence goes up or down. Sometimes it's because of the epidemic nature.'


People Criminological researchers frequently do have answers to why violence goes up or down. But most of the explanations are academic-heavy and not readily available to the public. There wasn’t a single criminologist or sociologist interviewed or cited in the article. Again, interesting read, but the disease model of violence is a pop-crime concept and is not supported in the academic literature. 

Is It Time to Treat Violence Like a Contagious Disease?

Interesting read, but the short answer is absolutely not. A disease model of violent crime is detrimental to the study of crime. Nice metaphor, but this is nowhere near academic worthiness. Mere exposure to violence does not account for enough variance in violent behaviors. Applying a disease model to violent crime or violence oversimplifies the phenomena and discredits the vast archive of criminological research on violence that has been established.

'People often don't have an answer why violence goes up or down. Sometimes it's because of the epidemic nature.'

People Criminological researchers frequently do have answers to why violence goes up or down. But most of the explanations are academic-heavy and not readily available to the public. There wasn’t a single criminologist or sociologist interviewed or cited in the article. Again, interesting read, but the disease model of violence is a pop-crime concept and is not supported in the academic literature. 



Reblog / posted 1 year ago with 25 notes
Neuroplasticity…

… is the most overused and misunderstood concept in neuroscience and psychology at the moment. 


approachingsignificance:

“I feel my heart ache, but I’ve forgotten what that feeling means.” -Chuck Palahniuk, Choke
Image credit: Kevin Curtis/Getty Images

approachingsignificance:

“I feel my heart ache, but I’ve forgotten what that feeling means.” -Chuck Palahniuk, Choke

Image credit: Kevin Curtis/Getty Images