Reblog / posted 2 days ago with 17 notes
"It is a capital mistake to theorize in advance of facts."
— Sherlock Holmes, The Adventure of the Second Stain

aseaofquotes:

Susan Beth Pfeffer, This World We Live In

aseaofquotes:

Susan Beth Pfeffer, This World We Live In


corporisfabrica:

Using a centrifuge, it is possible to separate blood into three main fractions. 
Although we are used to thinking of blood as a simple fluid, it is in fact a suspension of cells, debris and more within a carrier fluid. 
The uppermost and clear yellow layer pictured is that fluid: plasma. This is the majority of what makes up human blood - plasma constitutes about 55% of its volume - of which 95% by volume is pure water. 
The central layer of opaque white is known as the buffy coat. This fraction is comprised mainly of white blood cells and platelets. 
Finally, the lowermost fraction is made up of the all-important red blood cells; erythrocytes. These cells are responsible for oxygen’s transit around the body, and give blood its striking colour. 

corporisfabrica:

Using a centrifuge, it is possible to separate blood into three main fractions. 

Although we are used to thinking of blood as a simple fluid, it is in fact a suspension of cells, debris and more within a carrier fluid. 

The uppermost and clear yellow layer pictured is that fluid: plasma. This is the majority of what makes up human blood - plasma constitutes about 55% of its volume - of which 95% by volume is pure water. 

The central layer of opaque white is known as the buffy coat. This fraction is comprised mainly of white blood cells and platelets. 

Finally, the lowermost fraction is made up of the all-important red blood cells; erythrocytes. These cells are responsible for oxygen’s transit around the body, and give blood its striking colour. 


nevver:

X-ray specs, Carrie Witherell


therapy101:

Intense article, totally worth the read. Warning- it is intense and does include a graphic depiction of child pornography.

I think I just mentioned something about this. 


"I have an entire forest living inside of me and you have carved your initials into every tree."
— Pavana पवन 


moshita:

Anecdotes by medical practitioners 

"A woman came in for a baby check with her 6-month-old and she had what looked like chocolate milk in the baby’s bottle. So he started explaining to her as kindly as he could that she shouldn’t be giving her baby chocolate milk. At which point she interrupts him and says, ‘Oh that isn’t chocolate milk. It’s coffee! He just loves it!”

"I had a patient come in for an STD check. She was very upset and continued to tell me that she only had one partner. Progressing through my assessment, she further divulged that even if he was sleeping with other people it shouldn’t matter ‘because he uses a condom every time and he makes sure to wash it thoroughly after every use’.”

"Had a lady who measured her baby’s temperature by pre-heating the oven and putting one hand in front of it while the other hand was on the baby’s forehead. She told the nurse her baby’s fever was about 250 degrees.”

"Lady has to have foot amputated and is given waiver forms to sign pre-op. Buddy asks if she needs time to think about it. She’s very nonchalant and doesn’t seem to care much what they do. He gets suspicious and probes a bit as to why she’s not more concerned. She says she gets that they have to operate and it’s OK because the foot will grow back.”

"I had a couple who had been trying to conceive for over two years. I asked all the usual questions, how often do you have sex, any previous pregnancy, etc etc. Something seemed off to me during the consult, so I continued to ask questions. Finally I asked if he ejaculated while inserted into the vagina. Both parties looked confused.Turns out the couple was not having insertional sex at all. I had to awkwardly explain to them how insertional sex works. Diagrams were required.”

"Patient comes in, she’s upset. She’s pregnant, and she doesn’t understand why. She’s on the pill. Upon talking to her at great length, I find out that she only takes the pills on the days that she is sexually active – no other time.”

"Patient comes in with her bf. They are indignant, as if somehow I could’ve prevented [the pregnancy]. The problem? Well, the pills were bothering the girl’s stomach, so, being a gallant bf, he decided to start taking them instead.”

I was explaining the treatment to the husband of a patient about to be discharged. He kept nodding and agreeing with me, but I knew it was flying over his head. Turned out a fundamental problem was that I was describing the drugs as ‘tablets’ and he had no clue what those were.

Reddit thread 


biomedicalephemera:

Clinical shot of patient recovering from gas gangrene
Gas gangrene is usually caused by the anaerobic bacteria Clostridium perfringens, but can be caused by any other anaerobic bacteria that infects muscle tissue. It’s often fatal, as the infection and exotoxins from the bacteria quickly flood the bloodstream, in addition to breaking down the muscular tissue.
If amputation was not an option, debridement (the medical removal of dead or infected tissue) and excision was often the only treatment. Secondary infection after removal of the infected tissue was a common problem, but antibiotic use after treatment helped stave off new bacteria.
Image from Otis Archives

biomedicalephemera:

Clinical shot of patient recovering from gas gangrene

Gas gangrene is usually caused by the anaerobic bacteria Clostridium perfringens, but can be caused by any other anaerobic bacteria that infects muscle tissue. It’s often fatal, as the infection and exotoxins from the bacteria quickly flood the bloodstream, in addition to breaking down the muscular tissue.

If amputation was not an option, debridement (the medical removal of dead or infected tissue) and excision was often the only treatment. Secondary infection after removal of the infected tissue was a common problem, but antibiotic use after treatment helped stave off new bacteria.

Image from Otis Archives


Do you know of any research into treating people with extremely violent obsessions/impulses BEFORE they offend?
Anonymous

krayolablue91:

cognitivedefusion:

approachingsignificance:

Hello!

Honestly, I have only seen research in treatment  of violent obsessions or thoughts in persons with OCD before they offend. That is actually an area that needs massive research contributions. Having violent obsessions does not constitute a mental illness by itself, it is usually a symptoms of a larger diagnosis. Also, without knowing the person or the behaviors, it would be difficult to say that that are indeed obsessions (in the clinical sense) and not symptoms of poor emotional regulation. I have read pieces written by persons that are sexually attracted to children (that do not offend) having a hard time finding treatment options. 

Once they offend, there is mixed research on the treatment of violent offenders. Researchers often combine all types of treatment into a category leading many to believe the “nothing works” doctrine. Recent research has become more methodologically advanced and most point to cognitive behavioral therapies as the most successful treatment program. A recent thread of research focuses primarily on “treatment ready” signaling. 

So there is research in treatment of violent obsessions, most of it seems to revolve around OCD. There are violence avoidance techniques for these persons, but I am not sure how many of them have been rigorously tested. 

Anyone else familiar with this literature? psydoctor8 tedbunny cognitivedefusion scienceofeds psychhealth

Hopefully I address this as you asked it, but let me know if I am missing something.

Typically with OCD, the individual is remarkably distressed by the feared event, and so the last thing they want to do is something that would lead to that outcome. There are some individuals with hallucinations or delusions that are violent in nature, and there is some sense of relief that comes from “giving in” to them. That’s usually not how OCD is conceptualized, though.

An example that makes people nervous: there are parents with OCD who are terrified that they will harm their children. For instance, many parents will not let their babies sit in the kitchen with them while cooking for fear that they (the parent) will cause harm upon the baby with a knife. There’s zero intention, and of course the thought causes a remarkable amount of fear, it’s just that thought-action fusion taking place where “what if” turns into “oh my god that will happen.”

Exposure for such individuals is, to the dismay of many, have the baby in the kitchen while the individual is chopping food or cooking. It’s a violent obsession, yes, but individuals with OCD are terrified of those obsessions, and so their safety behavior is to avoid it at all costs. The notion that someone with pure OCD will “give in” to their obsessions by engaging in an act that will lead to the feared outcome, even when it is a violent obsession, just doesn’t seem to fit OCD pathology.

Same thing for people who think they will harm themselves. Exposure would be giving them a knife and holding it to their skin. Or giving them a bottle of pills to hold. (Of course this is only done when there is no history of suicidality.)

Basically if someone has a violent obsession and actually engages in some act that makes that obsession come to fruition, my hunch is that it’s either not OCD, or there’s something comorbid with the OCD that is driving the violence.

As you pointed out, I think there needs to be more research to tease those components out, but pure OCD is typically a persistent attempt to reduce the anxiety stemming from a feared situation as to avoid the situation itself; doing something exactly the opposite by actually fulfilling the violent thought would be very different from that.

Does any of that make sense?

Yeah, what the heck. I was going to say: from what I know, NO ONE with OCD has ever acted on such violent intrusive thoughts or images. The anxiety is overwhelming and horrifying. You’re so afraid you’ll do it, people often are horribly afraid to be around people or knives, or whatever else might “trigger” that anxiety.
Maybe I was unclear, but I didn’t mean to imply that persons with OCD are more violent, just that the bulk of the research that I have come across in violent impulses and obsessions in nonoffenders occurs in this area. 
"from what I know, NO ONE with OCD has ever acted on such violent intrusive thoughts or images."
That’s a drastic overgeneralization, let’s avoid that kind of discussion. 

sixpenceee:

This is beautiful and it’s amazing to me that it had such a positive outcome and not lifelong hateful grudges, which is probably what these attackers deserved. 

FOR MORE PORTRAITS AND THE OFFICIAL WEBPAGE

Love this. 


Do you know of any research into treating people with extremely violent obsessions/impulses BEFORE they offend?
Anonymous

Hello!

Honestly, I have only seen research in treatment  of violent obsessions or thoughts in persons with OCD before they offend. That is actually an area that needs massive research contributions. Having violent obsessions does not constitute a mental illness by itself, it is usually a symptoms of a larger diagnosis. Also, without knowing the person or the behaviors, it would be difficult to say that that are indeed obsessions (in the clinical sense) and not symptoms of poor emotional regulation. I have read pieces written by persons that are sexually attracted to children (that do not offend) having a hard time finding treatment options. 

Once they offend, there is mixed research on the treatment of violent offenders. Researchers often combine all types of treatment into a category leading many to believe the “nothing works” doctrine. Recent research has become more methodologically advanced and most point to cognitive behavioral therapies as the most successful treatment program. A recent thread of research focuses primarily on “treatment ready” signaling. 

So there is research in treatment of violent obsessions, most of it seems to revolve around OCD. There are violence avoidance techniques for these persons, but I am not sure how many of them have been rigorously tested. 

Anyone else familiar with this literature? psydoctor8 tedbunny cognitivedefusion scienceofeds psychhealth


tedbunny:

Thomas D. Mcavoy. Brain Surgery, 1958.


"The brain appears to possess a special area which we might call poetic memory and which records everything that charms or touches us, that makes our lives beautiful."
Milan Kundera,The Unbearable Lightness of Being

biomedicalephemera:

Cerebellum and ocular system in the human
In vertebrates, the eyeballs are direct extensions of the brain; that is, they evolved after the brain, and are literally unimpeded access to the cerebellum and cerebrum. Because of this, many ocular tumors or injuries can be far more dangerous to the brain than growths or injuries on any other part of the skull.
 Anatome ex omnium veterum recentiorumque observationibus. Thomas Bartholin, 1673.

biomedicalephemera:

Cerebellum and ocular system in the human

In vertebrates, the eyeballs are direct extensions of the brain; that is, they evolved after the brain, and are literally unimpeded access to the cerebellum and cerebrum. Because of this, many ocular tumors or injuries can be far more dangerous to the brain than growths or injuries on any other part of the skull.

Anatome ex omnium veterum recentiorumque observationibus. Thomas Bartholin, 1673.