blackpaint20:

Shell wound of the wrist.
Medical Illustration by William Shultze, 1863.

blackpaint20:

Shell wound of the wrist.

Medical Illustration by William Shultze, 1863.


bobbycaputo:

Murder as Damn(ed) Good Art: Robert Hariman on Organized Crime 
One hundred years ago Italian Futurism was one of the leading edges of modern art.  (A retrospective exhibition is currently up at the Guggenheim and reviewed by the Times here.)   Futurism was distinctively bold, uncannily tuned into the machine age, and violently prophetic during a period of extraordinary turbulence in art and politics.  It also celebrated violence.  Fortunately, few artists today would do that or be admired for doing so.  But they don’t have to, as the art of violence has moved on.
This photograph by Christopher Vanegas was one of the winners in the 2014 World Press Photo Contest.  It was not graced with the wealth of commentary regarding the winner, as one would expect of any contest.  It deserves more attention that it has received, however, and not because we need to fiddle with the rankings in a series of outstanding images.  The winner was a portrait of communication–indeed, an almost pure form of communication–and we ought to be talking about that, but the photo above is a study in both communication and violence, and we really need to be talking about that.
(Continue Reading)

bobbycaputo:

Murder as Damn(ed) Good Art: Robert Hariman on Organized Crime 

One hundred years ago Italian Futurism was one of the leading edges of modern art.  (A retrospective exhibition is currently up at the Guggenheim and reviewed by the Times here.)   Futurism was distinctively bold, uncannily tuned into the machine age, and violently prophetic during a period of extraordinary turbulence in art and politics.  It also celebrated violence.  Fortunately, few artists today would do that or be admired for doing so.  But they don’t have to, as the art of violence has moved on.

This photograph by Christopher Vanegas was one of the winners in the 2014 World Press Photo Contest.  It was not graced with the wealth of commentary regarding the winner, as one would expect of any contest.  It deserves more attention that it has received, however, and not because we need to fiddle with the rankings in a series of outstanding images.  The winner was a portrait of communication–indeed, an almost pure form of communication–and we ought to be talking about that, but the photo above is a study in both communication and violence, and we really need to be talking about that.

(Continue Reading)



Half female, half male. Bilateral gynandromorphism is a rare genetic disorder occurring in insects, arachnids, crustaceans, and birds, where a strange combination of genetic material splits a creature perfectly in half, with one side male and one side female.

Half female, half male. 

Bilateral gynandromorphism is a rare genetic disorder occurring in insects, arachnids, crustaceans, and birds, where a strange combination of genetic material splits a creature perfectly in half, with one side male and one side female.


strangeremains:

Syphilitic skull on display at the Hunterian Museum in London.

strangeremains:

Syphilitic skull on display at the Hunterian Museum in London.


pewresearch:

Public support for legalizing marijuana use is at an all-time high of 54%, though it is virtually unchanged from last year (52%). There is even more agreement that people convicted of possessing small amounts of marijuana should not serve time in jail.

pewresearch:

Public support for legalizing marijuana use is at an all-time high of 54%, though it is virtually unchanged from last year (52%). There is even more agreement that people convicted of possessing small amounts of marijuana should not serve time in jail.


Reblog / posted 1 day ago via nevver with 98 notes

nevver:

How Americans die, Bloomberg Visual Data


moshita:

Search for Evidence

Patrik Budenz


Reblog / posted 1 day ago with 55 notes

Choosing Redemption Over Revenge in Iran

Instead of participating in the execution of their son’s murderer, the slain man’s parents publicly spare the killer in northern Iran.

  1. Balal, who reportedly stabbed-to-death 18-year-old Abdolah Hosseinzadeh in a street fight in 2007, is led to the gallows to be executed on Tuesday.
  2. Abdolah Hosseinzadeh’s mothers slaps Balal, who was convicted of her son’s murder in the northern city of Nowshahr on Tuesday. In Iran, a victim’s family is able to participate in hangings by pushing aside the chair the convicted stands on. In this case, Hosseinzadeh’s parents removed the noose from Balal’s neck and spared his life, The Guardian reported.
  3. Abdolah Hosseinzadeh’s parents remove the noose from the neck of convicted murderer Balal, according to semi-official news service Isna and The Guardian newspaper.
  4. Samereh Alinejad cries after sparing the life of her son’s convicted murderer.
  5. The mother of Balal (L), who was convicted of murdering Abdolah Hosseinzadeh in a street fight in 2007, cries with Hosseinzadeh’s mother.

Touching. See Crime, Shame, and Reintegration by Braithwaite.

I abhor the death penalty, but love the role of the victim’s family in the punishment process. 


newsweek:

There is the Philadelphia you know and the Philadelphia you will never see. The first summons a cornucopia of familiar images: Benjamin Franklin, Rocky Balboa, cheesesteaks whiz wit. 

The second is safely out of view from the cobblestone streets of Society Hill or the brewpubs of Northern Liberties. But if you wander north on Broad Street, well past the alabaster phallus of City Hall, you may glimpse the first hints of that obscure Philadelphia in the emptied husk of the Divine Lorraine Hotel, a sullied spinster with more than a century of stories but nobody to hear them anymore. 

Shortly thereafter start the Badlands, North Philadelphia neighborhoods like Kensington, whose row-house lanes were once home to working-class whites whose modestly prosperous lives were circumscribed by the factory, the church, the union hall, the front stoop and the bar. 

On a summer Sunday, a trip to Connie Mack Stadium or an outing to the Jersey Shore. Then cue the familiar midcentury forces: minority influx, white flight, factories moving to China, crack, crack babies, the end of welfare as we know it, here at the end of the land, the Philadelphia you will never know. 

I drove through the Badlands with Barbara Laker and Wendy Ruderman, two journalists for the Philadelphia Daily News who shared a 2010 Pulitzer Prize for investigative reporting and are the authors of Busted: A Tale of Corruption and Betrayal in the City of Brotherly Love. 

The book is based on a newspaper series, “Tainted Justice,” that revealed such an astounding degree of corruption among Philadelphia’s drug cops that you would not quite believe it in a Martin Scorsese movie. But your belief, or lack thereof, is irrelevant, because this story is true. 

The Streets of Killadelphia

newsweek:

There is the Philadelphia you know and the Philadelphia you will never see. The first summons a cornucopia of familiar images: Benjamin Franklin, Rocky Balboa, cheesesteaks whiz wit.

The second is safely out of view from the cobblestone streets of Society Hill or the brewpubs of Northern Liberties. But if you wander north on Broad Street, well past the alabaster phallus of City Hall, you may glimpse the first hints of that obscure Philadelphia in the emptied husk of the Divine Lorraine Hotel, a sullied spinster with more than a century of stories but nobody to hear them anymore.

Shortly thereafter start the Badlands, North Philadelphia neighborhoods like Kensington, whose row-house lanes were once home to working-class whites whose modestly prosperous lives were circumscribed by the factory, the church, the union hall, the front stoop and the bar.

On a summer Sunday, a trip to Connie Mack Stadium or an outing to the Jersey Shore. Then cue the familiar midcentury forces: minority influx, white flight, factories moving to China, crack, crack babies, the end of welfare as we know it, here at the end of the land, the Philadelphia you will never know.

I drove through the Badlands with Barbara Laker and Wendy Ruderman, two journalists for the Philadelphia Daily News who shared a 2010 Pulitzer Prize for investigative reporting and are the authors of Busted: A Tale of Corruption and Betrayal in the City of Brotherly Love.

The book is based on a newspaper series, “Tainted Justice,” that revealed such an astounding degree of corruption among Philadelphia’s drug cops that you would not quite believe it in a Martin Scorsese movie. But your belief, or lack thereof, is irrelevant, because this story is true.

The Streets of Killadelphia



mediclopedia:

Medical Conspiracy/Crime #3
The Guatemala Syphilis experiments are sort of like the Tuskegee experiment’s unknown little brother. While in Tuskegee, the patients were exposed to syphilis naturally and then denied treatment… In Guatemala, they deliberately infected patients in the mental asylum and prisoners with syphilis. 
Then they used different chemicals to see what would prevent the spread of syphilis. Infected patients were then later treated with penicilin. 
The scariest part is that is that the person who spearheaded this experiment was a very respected physician.

John Charles Cutler, M.D. (June 29, 1915 – February 8, 2003) was a senior surgeon, and the acting chief of the venereal disease program in the United States Public Health Service.
Following his death in 2003, his involvement in several controversial and unethical medical experiments regarding syphilis was revealed, including the Guatemala and the Tuskegee syphilis experiment.

mediclopedia:

Medical Conspiracy/Crime #3

The Guatemala Syphilis experiments are sort of like the Tuskegee experiment’s unknown little brother. While in Tuskegee, the patients were exposed to syphilis naturally and then denied treatment… In Guatemala, they deliberately infected patients in the mental asylum and prisoners with syphilis. 

Then they used different chemicals to see what would prevent the spread of syphilis. Infected patients were then later treated with penicilin. 

The scariest part is that is that the person who spearheaded this experiment was a very respected physician.

John Charles Cutler, M.D. (June 29, 1915 – February 8, 2003) was a senior surgeon, and the acting chief of the venereal disease program in the United States Public Health Service.

Following his death in 2003, his involvement in several controversial and unethical medical experiments regarding syphilis was revealed, including the Guatemala and the Tuskegee syphilis experiment.


bobbycaputo:

Between the Lines | Photographs and text by K.K. DePaul

In 1929, my grandfather was hanged for murder.

It was a taboo subject in our family, and out of respect for my grandmother, nobody ever spoke of it. We believed that because my grandfather had been convicted on circumstantial evidence, he had been convicted wrongly.

After my grandmother’s death, I came into possession of a box she left for me. Contained within were all my grandfather’s personal effects during his year on death-row…newspapers, magazine articles about the trial, letters from lawyers, family members, and friends. It became quite clear, as I read between the lines…that he was guilty…that my grandmother knew it…and that after her death, she wanted me to know it, too.

(Continue Reading)


frontal-cortex:

Sad Science Art

By my good friend Lucia.


billowing:

Fábio Magalhães/Trouxas (Alusivo ao Artur Barrio)/Óleo sobre Adesivo Vinil/200 x 250 cm/2010.

billowing:

Fábio Magalhães/Trouxas (Alusivo ao Artur Barrio)/Óleo sobre Adesivo Vinil/200 x 250 cm/2010.


darksilenceinsuburbia:

Richard Ross

Juveline in Justice

1. A 15-year-old girl on suicide watch, under constant surveillance. In this behavior unit the residents become extremely jumpy and verbal when any event breaks their routine. At the moment all the girls are in their cells. In the entire facility, approximately 75 percent of the population have mental health needs, and of these, 67 percent take psychotropic medication. The construction paper names on the wall celebrate the corrections officers that work the unit. Macon Youth Development Campus, Macon, Georgia.

2. I’m doing my “seg time.” I spend all day and all night in here. No mattress, no sheets, and I get all my meals through this slot. — J., age 16, in a segregation cell in South Bend Juvenile Correctional Facility, South Bend, Indiana.

3. South Bend Juvenile Correctional Facility, South Bend, Indiana.

4. 

5. Giddings State School, in Giddings, Texas houses 320 juveniles and three types of offenders— capital and violent offenses, sexual offenses, and chemical and substance dependency.

6. The “Wall of Shame,” at Miami-Dade Regional Juvenile Detention Center, Miami, Florida: mug shots of kids that were released from the center and killed by gunshot wounds. “Expired” here indicates “deceased.”

7. Probation hearing room at Ventura Youth Correctional Facility, Camarillo, California

8. Control room at Racine Detention Facility, Racine, Wisconsin Twenty-three young men, undersupervised, at Orleans Parish Prison, Louisiana. There was a fight the night before, so staff has taken away privileges of TV, cards, and dominoes. The air conditioner is broken and it is August in New Orleans.

9. I was with a group of guys when I was 13. We jumped this guy near the lake. We got about $400. They gave me the gun ’cause I was the youngest. I been in Juno cottage for two years. I was coming back from the med unit with a homie and we broke into the canteen through a window and ate all the candy bars we could find. He got sick and we only had a five-minute pass so they caught us. I got sent to Valis but got played by a staff there so they sent me here to Martin. —S.T., age 15 Ethan Allen School, Wales, Wisconsin.

10. This is the first time I am here, ever. They are charging me with armed burglary of a residence. —K.T., age 16 Turner Guilford Knight (TGK) Correctional Center in Miami, Florida.