Reblog / posted 2 days ago via beb0pp · © chromeus with 369 notes

Hey I was hoping you could help me out. I'm a CJ major, senior and I'm trying to apply to do an internship for the local FBI branch next February. Since you've already went through this step, I was hoping you could give me some tips on what to include with my resume that would help me have a better chance of being selected.
Anonymous

Hello!

I have never applied for an internship with the FBI, so I’m not sure I can be much help. I really only have knowledge about applying to research-based graduate programs and for research-based grants. Is this a research internship?


Reblog / posted 2 days ago with 14 notes
"The law is a highly traditional mechanism that emphasizes stability and that was aptly described by Justice Holmes in 1914 as ‘government of the living by the dead.’"
— Richard Rogers, 1987

"The only thing that makes life possible is permanent, intolerable uncertainty: not knowing what comes next."

Ursula K. Le Guin, The Left Hand of Darkness

I counter with, “The only thing that makes like possible is the permanent, tolerable certainty in the face of the all the permanent intolerable uncertainty we experience on a daily basis.”


"We conclude that there is a pattern and practice of conduct at Rikers that violates the constitutional rights of adolescent inmates. In particular, we find that adolescent inmates at Rikers are not adequately protected from harm, including serious physical harm from the rampant use of unnecessary and excessive force by DOC staff. In addition, adolescent inmates are not adequately protected from harm caused by violence inflicted by other inmates, including inmate-on-inmate fights. Indeed, we find that a deep-seated culture of violence is pervasive throughout the adolescent facilities at Rikers, and DOC staff routinely utilize force not as a last resort, but instead as a means to control the adolescent population and punish disorderly or disrespectful behavior. Moreover, DOC relies far too heavily on punitive segregation as a disciplinary measure, placing adolescent inmates—many of whom are mentally ill—in what amounts to solitary confinement at an alarming rate and for excessive periods of time."

Letter to Mayor de Blasio and the Commissioner of New York City Department of Corrections, from the U.S. Department of Justice, United States Attorney, Southern District of New York. 

To those busy patting yourself on the back for the attention that solitary confinement for juveniles is getting, great. But that is just one of 80 pages worth of problems that also need attention. 

"Simply put, Rikers is a dangerous place for adolescents and a pervasive climate of fear exists." 

(via psydoctor8)



youdtearthiscanvasskinapart:

My criminologist is coming out on twitter

Except nothing in the data supports this. At all. 
Controlling for all other important case variables, the sentencing literature REPEATEDLY shows that women receive shorter sentences compared to men, even if looking at homicides only. Female offenders are seen as less blameworthy, less of a threat to the community, and have more “mitigating factors” argued for their case (including having a child). This is not something that is debated in the criminological literature. At all. The gender gap in sentencing is LARGER than the race gap in sentencing. 

youdtearthiscanvasskinapart:

My criminologist is coming out on twitter

Except nothing in the data supports this. At all. 

Controlling for all other important case variables, the sentencing literature REPEATEDLY shows that women receive shorter sentences compared to men, even if looking at homicides only. Female offenders are seen as less blameworthy, less of a threat to the community, and have more “mitigating factors” argued for their case (including having a child). This is not something that is debated in the criminological literature. At all. The gender gap in sentencing is LARGER than the race gap in sentencing. 



prisoners and their women

prisoners and their partners

prisoners and their women

prisoners and their partners


Do you have any thoughts about the idea of being 'ready' for therapy? Are there ever situations where a person is not 'ready' (what does that actually mean?), and how could you become more 'ready'?
Anonymous

cognitivedefusion:

Admittedly I’m having a tough time figuring out if there’s a reason someone who wishes to pursue therapy should refrain from doing so…

Ambivalence is fine, lack of interest or engagement can be worked with, and if someone is looking to better themselves whether on a smaller or larger scale it’s all worth their time.

Anyone else have thoughts on whether there’s a good reason to not pursue therapy?

As a tangent, we do talk about the “readiness” for therapy or rehabilitation in correctional settings. Recidivism programs have notoriously low success rates and recent scholars have argued that in order for rehabilitation to be successful, the individual must be open to change and must alter their cognitive reasoning, attitude toward drug use, antisocial attitudes, reading level, vocation skills, etc.. Experiences within the prison walls have the ability to close off the individual to change or make change a more appealing option. It is still unclear how identity transformations, increased levels of strain, victimization within the prison, and visitations affect the individual in terms of being malleable (MacKenzie, 2006).

I know it isn’t directly related to the topic, but I thought it was interesting. Of course our outcome is recidivism and not a sense of well-being or symptom management/reduction. 

 



Reblog / posted 5 days ago with 16 notes
Academia

How to Make 5 Hours of Work Look Like 10 Hours of Work: An Autobiography


Reblog / posted 6 days ago with 61 notes
Ecological Fallacy

The ecological fallacy occurs when you make conclusions about individuals based only on analyses of group data.

For instance, assume that you measured the math scores of a particular classroom and found that they had the highest average score in the district. Later, you run into one of the kids from that class and you think to yourself “she must be a math whiz.”

This is an effect which occurs when people use statistical data and apply it incorrectly. It is often used by people who are seeking factual support for their arguments.

It is sometimes also used by researchers who are a bit too keen on proving something.


how most academic research goes

phdstudents:

image

You might be doing it wrong. 


Reblog / posted 1 week ago with 25 notes
"What makes American culture relatively distinctive… is that it is a society which places a high premium on economic affluence and social ascent for all its members… This patterned expectation is regarded as appropriate for everyone, irrespective of his initial lot or station in life… This leads to the subsidiary theme that success or failure are results wholly of personal qualities, that he who fails has only himself to blame, for the corollary to the concept of the self-made man is the self-unmade man. To the extent that this cultural definition is assimilated by those who have not made their mark, failure represents a double defeat: the manifest defeat of remaining far behind in the race for success and the implicit defeat of not having the capacities and moral stamina needed for success… It is in this cultural setting that, in a significant portion of cases, the threat of defeat motivates men to the use of those tactics, beyond the law or the mores, which promise `success’… The moral mandate to achieve success thus exerts pressure to succeed, by fair means and by foul means if necessary."
— Robert Merton (1968)

Reblog / posted 1 week ago with 10 notes

Measured attitudes are weakly correlated with actual behaviors.

Just a little reminder.